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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Google Labs Aptitude Test (GLAT):

» Even Non Geeks Might Enjoy... from John Battelle's Searchblog
...reading Adam Rifkin's post about the Google Labs Aptitude Test, which is included at the bottom of his post. Sample question: 6. On your first day at Google, you discover that your cubicle mate wrote the textbook you used as a primary resource in yo... [Read More]

» Google Labs Aptitude Test (GLAT) from A Sabre Geek
I received my copy of the GLAT with the current issue of MIT’s Technology Review magazine (sub required). “Simply answer all questions to the best of your abilities (cheaters answer to the karma police)..... Adam Rifkin has duplicated the questions [Read More]

» Questions from the Google Labs Aptitude Test from Search Engine Watch Blog
Both G.L. and J.B. point us to this this blog post by Adam Rifkin that includes questions from the Google Labs Aptitude Test.... [Read More]

» GLAT from Shima's
Googleのユニークな適性テスト、実は求人広告?という記事があったので、さっそくGLATをやってみることに。画像をテキストにしたものがこちら。   響きはGMATのパロディっぽいけど、記述以外でぱっと見わかる問題がない…。そしてなんだかジョークっぽいのもはいってる。... [Read More]

» GLAT Question 1 from Elliott C. Back, Cornell Student
[Read More]

» "Fluffy Bunny" is a WinSock-puppet from The Now Economy
We love Google's new Desktop Search. We've been arguing about something like this for a year or more. The idea of searching everything you've seen — not just your hard drive, but everything hyperlinked to it (such as your surfing... [Read More]

» Questions from the Google Labs Aptitude Test from Search Engine Watch Blog
Both G.L. and J.B. point us to this blog post by Adam Rifkin that includes questions from the Google Labs Aptitude Test. UPDATE: Google Has Posted the Test on the Google Blog.... [Read More]

» Hiring 101 from Relax, Everything Is Deeply Intertwingled
As I updated my Entrepreneurship 101 post, I re-read Hiring: No False Positives by Joe Kraus, and Hiring: False Positives and Negatives by Tim Converse, and I was struck by how challenging hiring is, even if you know what you [Read More]

» The GLAT from a free Orange | Links
A sample Google Labs Aptitude Test.... [Read More]

Comments

Elizabeth

I'm never going to be employed again.

Adam

Doesn't the IRS owe you money? Clearly you know their job better than them, so clearly they should hire you...

Elizabeth

Whoa...you DO read me.

I only know that they owe me money because TurboTax told me so. So for the most part I'm just putting my faith (and numbers) in Intuit. Who will win - TT vs. IRS? I guess we'll see.

Adam

Of course I read you.

Your question inspired me to look up TurboTax's How to Survive an IRS Audit, which links to IRS Publication 1: Your Rights as a Taxpayer.

Which didn't answer your question at all ("do I trust Intuit or the IRS?").

The Web is a marvellous place for finding things. Unless you want to find the answer to a specific question, in which case, you takes your chances...

Timboy

Agreed about the dire consequences of false positives. But there's something both creepy and (I'm guessing) counterproductive about doing the screening with the same kind of test all the time on all the people you hire.

If you screen everyone with wonky puzzle questions, and insist that anyone who seemingly does badly on them is dinged, then you're going to get a company full of people who like to solve wonky puzzles, and nobody else. This might sound like heaven (and I like puzzles like that myself), but are you sure that you don't need a little bit more diversity in your ecosystem than that?

DF

I have to admit that 'no false positives' kinda bugs me. I mean, yeah, you do want no false positives. But *one* dissenting interview?

*shrug*

Well, that explains why--while doing highly relevant research, and being reccomended internally by four different current employees--I got dropped like a hot potato from the interview process.

It seems an odd sort of optimization, unless you really assume that good people are pretty much interchangable.

About cheating: my favorite final exam in grad school was in a Mathematical Logic course --- five problems, take-home for one week, collaboration encouraged. The only rules were: credit everyone you collaborated with, and turn in your own write-up (on the theory that if you can hold it in your mind for long enough to write it up, then you understand it).

The professor's rationale for all this was: mathematics is a fundamentally social activity. (A minority view, admittedly.)

Adam

Timboy wrote: "...then you're going to get a company full of people who like to solve wonky puzzles, and nobody else. This might sound like heaven (and I like puzzles like that myself), but are you sure that you don't need a little bit more diversity in your ecosystem than that?"

And if your monoculture is the result of inbreeding, you just might be a redneck Googleite.

Danyelf wrote: "It seems an odd sort of optimization, unless you really assume that good people are pretty much interchangable."

As Tim O'Reilly said, "no matter how big you are, all the smart people don't work for you."

Anonymous wrote: "The only rules were: credit everyone you collaborated with, and turn in your own write-up... Mathematics is a fundamentally social activity."

That's so cool. I wish more teachers possessed that kind of enlightenment.

And, for fun, let's check out the Gbrowser rumors: "Google has done some high profile hiring in the recent days. 4 people who worked on Internet Explorer (one being Adam Bosworth), another one from Java lead developers (Joshua Bloch) and another guy (Joe Beda) who was working on future Microsoft technologies like Avalon and Longhorn. It is also notable that Google now holds ownership of the domain name GBrowser.com leading to more speculation of a browser from Google’s stable." As notable as a Googlewhack. Scratch that. As notable as a book on googlewhacking...

jeff

Unless you went to MIT, Stanford, or a 1st tier engineering school with a MS, Ph.D, Google won't even consider your resume submission. That's submission, not consideration to even glance at your resume. Even if it's only for a mid-level software position! Frankly, with that kind of 'great thou art' attitude, who wants to work for such a pretentious arrogant company?

Adam

Who wants to work for such a company?

At least 2400 people, when last I counted... :)

Tanko

Problem with silly tests like this is Google will have a bunch of book smart people, but very few creative people that are needed to come up with ideas from no-where. I'm sick of egotistical programmers that think the whole world revolves around technical smarts. There are a lot of different kinds of smarts in the world. It would be nice if a company of Google's size would invest in diversity.

When you're in a fast moving business, it's good to have people that rock the boat with new off-the-wall ideas, not people self-selected to think exactly like you.

2 cents from someone that would never get hired at Google.

Adam

Every single person I know at Google is both book smart and creative. It's true that I only know 24 of the 2400 folks at Google, but I'd like to think they're a representative slice of the population.

jeff

I"m just a straight shooter with an ultimate dream of doing absolutely nothing. :)

Hann Channing

Has not anybody realized that Google "test" is just another marketing questionnare? They are segmenting their target markets! for Planck sake!

Adam

Of course it's just marketing. And beautiful marketing at that! By the way, now you can officially get a beautiful green-and-white copy of the GLAT from Google.

Jeff, your dreams of doing nothing remind me of the movie Office Space:

Peter Gibbons : What would you do if you had a million dollars?
Lawrence : I'll tell you what I'd do, man, two chicks at the same time, man.
Peter Gibbons : That's it? If you had a million dollars, you'd do two chicks at the same time?
Lawrence : Damn straight. I always wanted to do that, man. And I think if I had a million dollars I could hook that up, cause chicks dig a dude with money.
Peter Gibbons : Well, not all chicks.
Lawrence : Well the kind of chicks that'd double up on a dude like me do.
Peter Gibbons : Good point.
Lawrence : Well what about you now? what would you do?
Peter Gibbons : Besides two chicks at the same time?
Lawrence : Well yeah.
Peter Gibbons : Nothing.
Lawrence : Nothing, huh?
Peter Gibbons : I'd relax, I would sit on my ass all day, I would do nothing.
Lawrence : Well you don't need a million dollars to do nothing, man. Just take a look at my cousin, he's broke, don't do shit.

lynn

dear editor,

re: question 11 - by 2:00 pm the washing should be on the line, possibly even dry!

Adam

Wow, thanks Lynn!

(As an aside, I got very excited when I discovered there was a Laundry Web Service until I realized that it wasn't quite a Web Service, but rather a Laundry Service with the name Web. We techies are so easily led astray... :)

And Jeff, that Office Space soundboard is hilarious...

Kannappan

Hey Am unable to find answers to any of the logical questions...Dumb Me...

dan

The scary thing about question 6 is why does a company with that much respect for
intellect cram its workers in a cubicle?
(Worse yet, two to a cube.)

Adam

Unfortunately, in Silicon Valley cubes are the norm, Dan. :(

Kannappan, which logical question would you like the answer to? Perhaps Google answers can help... :)

By the way, there's a great reference to this post by Peter Coffee at eWeek, which I'll quote here:

As CommerceNet Fellow Adam Rifkin has observed, Google had better hope for a vigorous response, because the company will need a lot of smart and hard-working people to live up to Web designer Jason Kottke's April prediction that the company will be "the biggest and most important company in the world in 5-8 years." That stems from a view of Google, not as mere search engine, but as a versatile services platform that's backed by huge amounts of exceptionally cost-effective computation: Kottke, in turn, points to Topix.net founder/CEO Rich Skrenta's April characterization of Google as "the world's biggest computer and most advanced operating system."

George Bush

Google sucks..this is the worst search engine ever created.With no interface to visualzie the creativity...
Sucks! sucks ! sucks

Adam

A vote for Bush is a vote against Google? ;)

Howard Robbins

GLAT Problem: Given a triangle ABC, how would you use only a compass and straight edge to find a point P such that triangles ABP, ACP, and BCP have equal perimeters? (Assume that ABC is constructed so that a solution does exist.)

ANSWER: Draw a circle about point A with radius BC, a circle about point B with radius AC, and a circle about point C with radius AB. Then the stated problem is almost equivalent to the classic problem of constructing a circle that is tangent to three given circles. I say "almost" because not all solutions of the three-circle problem are acceptable solutions of the GLAT problem. Solutions of the 3-circles problem can be found as follows: Increase or decrease the radii of all 3 circles an increment D, which is chosen to make two of the circles become tangent to each other. Then an inversion [a geometric transformation that replaces radii by their reciprocals] about the point of tangency converts 2 of the 3 circles into a pair of parallel lines, and converts the 3rd circle into a new circle. Find a circle that is tangent to both of these lines, and is also tangent to the transformed version of the 3rd circle. [This is trivially easy, but gives multiple solutions.] Then inverting its 3 points of tangency gives 3 points on a circle that solves the 3-circle problem (after adjusting its radius by increment D.) If its tangencies are all external, or all internal, to the 3 original circles, it also solves the GLAT problem: its center is point P.

Adam

Howard, that's beautiful. If I worked at Google, I would hire you on the spot. Alas, I do not work at Google...

The comments to this entry are closed.

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