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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Web 2.0:

» Web 2.0 from The Now Economy
I posted my Web 2.0 Notes on my typepad for anyone who's interested...... [Read More]

» Web 2.0 Notes from A Sabre Geek
Adam Rifkin’s notes from Web 2.0. Lots of interesting one liners - a bit long but worth the read. [Read More]

» Web 2.0 Conference blog roundup followup from UserDriven
Wow. Lots of traffic hitting the UserDriven site for the UserDriven: Web 2.0 Conference blog roundup post about the Web 2.0 Conference. Looks like there is still a whole bunch of interest in the Web. But then again, that should [Read More]

» Web 2.0 summary from A Penny For...
I know this is a little after the fact, but this is an outstanding summary from the Web 2.0 conference. Lots of interesting things on trends and ideas...... [Read More]

» Web 2.0 summary from TJ's Weblog
Indeed Web2.0 has been happing some days ago but this summary is truly outstanding. If you haven't followed up the conference, check it out. (Thanks Todd!)... [Read More]

» Web 2.0과 NGWeb from HOLLOBLOG (별주부뎐)
태우님의 Web 2.0 코멘트에 대해 트랙백을 대신해 글로 올립니다. -------------- Semantic Web와 마찬가지로, Web 2.0도 특정한 기술을 지칭하는 것은 아니고, 단지 지향하고자 하는 '비전'에 가깝다고 보시면 됩니다. Web 2.0 Conference에서도 이야기 되었던 것처럼 'W... [Read More]

» Do You Want to a Job at ESPN? from reemer.com
Do you want to create products that are used daily by millions of people? Do you want to work on products that are changing the face of digital media? Do you grok Web 2.0 and want your great ideas to... [Read More]

» aect.org / aect-members.org from Communications Services
This post is a proposal for a marketing, communications, and member-benefit oriented approach to utilizing RSS (from AECT weblogs) as a defined and preferred process for electronic publishing. It's going to cover a lot of ground, explaining (hopefully)... [Read More]

» Web 2.0 from Johnnie Manzari
Original Post: 23 Mar 2005 Updated: 25 Mar 2005 We're on to Web 2.0. "But we're not even finished debugging Web 1.0," you say. Oh well. With God as Product Manager you have little choice but to upgrade. What is... [Read More]

» mobile phones with free gifts from mobile phones with free gifts
Most people make the mistake of going direct to a UK network for the next mobile phone... not knowing that there are incentives available from household names such as Tesco. These include Laptops, HDTV's, Wii's, Playstations, Tom Toms and much more. [Read More]

Comments

Ross Stapleton-Gray

There are 26 million books in the Library of Congress. Over half are out of copy, and many are out of print. Since a book is roughly a Megabyte of storage, 26 million books can be stored in 26 Terabytes, which costs $60k and could fit in a very small room.

It costs $10 to digitize a book and get it online, so the Library of Congress could be completely digitized for $260 million.

Where is Brewster digging up these numbers? $10 to digitize a book? Maybe a text-only scan of some pulp novel you could bust up and feed into an OCR, but I've got to believe that the works in the LOC might require a bit more care and attention. "Birds of North America," ferinstance, with all those pesky Audubon prints. I strongly suspect that if Brewster got numbers from preservationists digitizing historic books, he'd get widely differing numbers.

I can't help but marvel at the sheer mass of on-line content today, though; having gotten my primary and secondary education without ever using a computer, I've now got vastly more than the whole of my old high school library at my fingertips.

Adam

Good points, Ross. For example, the SIMS analysis does say that the 26 million books in the Library of Congress would actually need 208 Terabytes to store.

There's a lot of other good bits in the SIMS analysis; for example,

Approximately 240 terabytes (compressed) of unique data are recorded on printed media worldwide each year...

World flow: Scanned: 1200 TB, Compressed: 240 TB, Text: 24 TB

United States flow: Scanned: 421 TB, Compressed: 84 TB, Text: 8.2 TB

James Sherrett

Adam, great summary of the conference. I'm back in the office now and reading through your synopsis brings back all that energy and enthusiasm for the ideas presented. Thanks for all the links and notes. As I attended I wondered what everyone with their laptop was doing - it seemed to me that they weren't really paying attention to the presentations, but rather, they were hypnotized by the wireless Internet access available and forgot how great it was to be there, in that moment. But now I'm reconsidering that thought, since your notes do such a great job of capturing the content and feel. Hmm. Perhaps I'll be one of the hypnotized next conference?

Adam

Thanks for the comment, James, but actually I left my laptop at home the entire week. All of my notes were hand-written in a small notebook, and I filtered out my favorite 20 percent for this post.

I think the best reason to go to a conference like Web 2.0 is to get away from the machines for a while and interact with other people who are changing the world -- and in so doing, realize the amazing ability of individuals and small groups to do innovative things. That's what I found so energizing, and that's what left me with such a wonderfully optimistic feeling.

NudeCybot

awesome, wish I had been there, thanks for the summary!

Is this a fucking joke? Are you real? This entire W 2.0 travesty is basically a robot communism. Privacy and individual identity will no longer be in the equation, once this ball really starts rolling. Do you not see how frightening that will be? Giving the masses access to every aspect in one another's lives? Each person clickity click clicking away at a little machine that they are sucked into like a fly to light. Sorry, but that's just entirely too open for me. This is a Brave New World turning out as prophecy of our immediate future.

MMO

I Agree. Privacy will be almost completely gone once web 2.0 rolls out. There won't even be a need for individual privacy though.

Account Deleted

Each person clickity click clicking away at a little machine that they are sucked into like a fly to light. Sorry, but that's just entirely too open for me. This is a Brave New World turning out as prophecy of our immediate future. There are at least three things about Kevin's comment that made Rohit smile: the invocation of physics, the notion that 30 is relative, and the thought of seeing you next week.

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Account Deleted

has someone been to the web 2.0 summit this year ? it was a week ago and the presentations were terrific ! A lot of knowledge for me ! :)

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Music

Reading

  • John Battelle: The Search

    John Battelle: The Search
    My favorite book of 2005. Period.


    (*****)

  • Steven D. Levitt: Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

    Steven D. Levitt: Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything
    "Just because two things are correlated does not mean that one causes the other. A correlation simply means that a relationship exists between two factors -- let's call them X and Y -- but it tells you nothing about the direction of that relationship. It's possible that X causes Y; it's also possible that Y causes X; and it may be that X and Y are both being caused by some other factor, Z.

    Economics is, at root, the study of incentives: how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing.

    Incentives are the cornerstone of modern life. The conventional wisdom is often wrong. Dramatic effects often have distant, even subtle, causes. Experts use their informational advantage to serve their own agenda. Knowing what to measure and how to measure it makes a complicated world much less so." (*****)

  • Malcolm Gladwell: Blink

    Malcolm Gladwell: Blink
    A book of anecdotes about the power of thinking without thinking; this book is a more interesting read than Gladwell's previous, The Tipping Point.

    New York Times: "Gottman believes that each relationship has a DNA, or an essential nature. It's possible to take a very thin slice of that relationship, grasp its fundamental pattern and make a decent prediction of its destiny. Gladwell says we are thin-slicing all the time -- when we go on a date, meet a prospective employee, judge any situation. We take a small portion of a person or problem and extrapolate amazingly well about the whole."

    David Brooks, who wrote that review, adds: "Isn't it as possible that the backstage part of the brain might be more like a personality, some unique and nontechnological essence that cannot be adequately generalized about by scientists in white coats with clipboards?" (*****)

  • Paul Graham: Hackers and Painters

    Paul Graham: Hackers and Painters
    I don't agree with some parts of this book, but I truly loved reading it, and it really made me think. I referenced it in my weblications and superhacker and phoneboy posts. Favorite chapter is How to Make Wealth. (Thanks, Ev.) (*****)

  • Joel Spolsky: Joel on Software

    Joel Spolsky: Joel on Software
    Joel is really good at wielding "diverse and occasionally related matters of interest to software developers, designers, and managers, and those who, whether by good fotune or ill luck, work with them in some capacity."

    Joel on Software embodies the principle of "Welcome to management! Guess what? Managing software projects has nothing at all to do with programming." This book, a compendium of the website's wisdom, is useful for everyone from team leads estimating schedules to software CEOs developing competitive strategy. (*****)

  • Bruce Sterling: Tomorrow Now: Envisioning The Next Fifty Years

    Bruce Sterling: Tomorrow Now: Envisioning The Next Fifty Years
    Bruce wrote this book to come to terms with seven novel aspects of the twenty-first century, situations that are novel to that epoch and no other. It's about future possibilities.

    "This is the future as it is felt and understood: via human experience... The years to come are not merely imaginary. They are history that hasn't happened yet. People will be born into these coming years, grow to maturity in them, struggle with their issues, personify those years, and bear them in their flesh. The future will be lived." Here here, well-spoken, Bruce. (*****)

  • The World's 20 Greatest Unsolved Problems: John Vacca

    The World's 20 Greatest Unsolved Problems: John Vacca
    "Science has extended life, conquered disease, and offered new sexual and commercial freedoms through its rituals of discovery, but many unsolved problems remain...

    If support for science falters and if the American public loses interest in it, such apathy may foster an age in which scientific elites ignore the public will and global imperatives." (*****)

  • Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, L. Hunter Lovins : Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution

    Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, L. Hunter Lovins : Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution
    I had the pleasure recently of meeting Amory Lovins and hearing him talk about Twenty Hydrogen Myths and the design of hypercar. (He also talked about Bonobos... wow.) I'm a convert to the way of thinking espoused in Natural Capitalism. I used to be cynical about the future, but Amory's work has made me a believer that many great things are about to come. The best way to predict the future is to invent it. (*****)

  • Merrill R. Chapman: In Search of Stupidity: Over 20 Years of High-Tech Marketing Disasters

    Merrill R. Chapman: In Search of Stupidity: Over 20 Years of High-Tech Marketing Disasters
    In hilarious prose, this book catalogs lots of stoopid high-tech marketing decisions. It offers clear, detailed analysis of many a marketing mishap, with what happened, why, and how to avoid such stupidity. Might just be the best. book. ever... (*****)

  • Paul Krugman: The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century

    Paul Krugman: The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century
    A book exposing the pitfalls of crony capitalism, from corrupt corporations straight up to the executive branch of our government. Krugman is nonpartisan -- what he exposes is foolish short-term thinking on the part of recent United States policies. The patriotic thing to do, he advises, is to fix these economic problems now before they become much harder to solve.

  • Henry Petroski: Small Things Considered: Why There Is No Perfect Design

    Henry Petroski: Small Things Considered: Why There Is No Perfect Design
    "Design can be easy and difficult at the same time, but in the end, it is mostly difficult." (*****)

  • Alexander Blakely: Siberia Bound

    Alexander Blakely: Siberia Bound
    One of my favorite books of the past few years. Xander is a master storyteller. (*****)

  • Susan Scott: Fierce Conversations

    Susan Scott: Fierce Conversations
    How to make every conversation count. One of my favorite books of the last decade. (*****)

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